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Sunday, February 10, 2013

Chicken Enchiladas

I heard somewhere, "Next Food Network Star", that every dish should have a story.  This personalizes the dish and makes the viewer more interested and connected to what you are preparing.  Typically these include some fond childhood memory or exciting travel experience.  This is my personal story connected to Chicken Enchiladas.  I had left over corn tortillas from taco night and needed to use them.   

Chicken Enchiladas

  • 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breast or strips
  • 1/2 Red Onion, diced
  • 1 Bell Pepper, diced
  • 2 gloves Garlic, diced
  • 1 cup Cheddar Cheese, shreded
  • 1 cup Pepperjack Cheese, shredded
  • 2 Tbs Flour
  • Corn tortillas
  • Note:  For soft pliable tortillas coat each side lightly with cooking spray and bake on a sheet tray for about 5 minutes each at 300 degrees.  The tortillas can overlap.  Remove from the oven and set aside until cool enough to handle.
  • Sour Cream
  • 1 can of Enchilada Sauce
  • Seasonings:  Salt, Pepper, Cumin
  • Season raw chicken with salt, pepper, and cumin then fry in some olive oil, a few minutes on each side, until cooked through.  Cut the chicken into small chunks after it is cooked and set aside.  In a separate pan saute onions, pepper, and garlic.  Add the chicken chunks to sauteed vegetables and add 1 cup of your mixed shredded cheeses.  Add 2 Tbs of flour and some more seasoning to taste.  The flour holds it together.  Add  about 1/4 cup enchilada sauce to a glass baking dish to coat the bottom of the dish.  Spoon chicken filling into tortillas and fold.  Set in a row in the dish.  Pour the rest of the Enchilada sauce on top and sprinkle the remaining cup of cheese.  Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.  Top with a dollop of sour cream for garnish. Serve with rice.

One of the most significant Allosaurus finds was the 1991 discovery of "Big Al", a 95% complete, partially articulated specimen that measured about 26 ft in length excavated near Shell, Wyoming.  It is currently on display at the University of Wyoming.   http://www.uwyo.edu/geomuseum/exhibits/allosaurus.html